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A blog is a website for which an individual or a group frequently generates text, photographs, video or audio files, and/or links, typically (but not always) on a daily basis. The term is a shortened form of weblog. Authoring a blog, maintaining a blog or adding an article to an existing blog is called "blogging". Individual articles on a blog are called "blog posts," "posts," or "entries". The person who posts these entries is called a "blogger".
-Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog on 12/17/2005


Abbreviated History


In the beginning, there was HTML. The writers of research papers looked upon it and saw that it was good. (Don't worry, you don't need to know HTML.)

Then came Mosaic, and more people started using the world wide web.

Before long startup companies like Tripod and Geocities began offering free hosting for web sites, paid for through pop-up or banner ads added to those pages. They even offered templates so people with no HTML knowledge could still create a web site from scratch in a few minutes.

This was good, but these pages (and most of the web) were all static. They could be edited, but they were lacking many of the features that are today taken for granted.

Time passed.

HTML was slowly pushed aside by CSS, which made managing multiple pages a lot easier. (Don't worry, you don't need to know any CSS either.)

Java, JavaScript, PHP, RSS and MySQL made tools available to have servers create instant made-to-order web pages, images, and more. (Nope, you don't need to know how to make any of these either. We'll go into more depth with RSS later, though.)

And somewhere along the way, the blog was perfected.

Blogging Defined


Every blog is in fact a web site, and could be used just like any other web site. The difference is that a blog has some kind of tool that makes updates, or posts, very easy to do. In the past you had to be a geek if you wanted a web site. Now, anyone can do it.

Audio Explanation

For those of you who are more auditory learners, try this mp3 of a session where Aaron Smith explains blogs. (9.8 MB, 28 min 37 sec)